Unimog U500 (405.201)


Every couple of years I build another Unimog; they tend to be a favorite subject.

Instructions may be found here.

Unimog U500 (405.201)

Right after the LEGO Batmobile 76139 was released, I saw the front tires, and immediately planned this Unimog. The tires were perfect for a U500. I stared working on a draft before I had acquired the tires. I wanted the build to be in the theme of my Unimog 437 in that it was about 1:18 in scale, and had modular cabins and bed options. But I wanted to take this idea to the next level so that front and rear attachments could be added, as well as trailers. Many of my builds as of late are more system focused, in that a main build supports lots of other attachments, trailers, and versions of the same build. With this one, standard attachment points on the front, rear, bed, cab, and hitches allow for a variety of versions and attachments to be added quickly. I’ll make more of these soon.

Rear Hitch, Attachment point, PTO, and PPTO

I quickly set up a front and rear suspension using what was learned on the 437. The MOC has front and rear live axle suspension, four wheel drive, and front steering. A I4 engine is placed under the cab, over the front axle. Unlike the 437, I added a front and rear PTO. The rear PTO has an on/off switch. A center PTO is present as well for attachments that go in place of the rear bed. Finally, I added a Pneumatic pump behind the cabin to run pneumatics on the front or rear of the truck. A value determines if the preasure goes to the front or rear.

U500 Chassis

I added a three way tipper bed on the rear of the chassis, and created a way for the cab to be tilted. Both can be released by pulling a couple of axles out to allow for the tipping. The cab has seating for three, and both doors open. Finally, I added a front winch that is released and wound up using the fake air tanks on the left of the truck.

In the coming months I will make some attachments and trailers for this truck and for a U400/430 version that use the chassis of the U500 with some adjustments.

2016 Unimog U430

The truck turned out how I wanted it too, and had the features work the way as intended. The suspension is a little hard, but that supports various attachments well. This tipper bed and winch are a little addictive to play with. I did not spend much time making attachments for this truck, but I hope to do so soon. Until the next build or Unimog, Happy Building.

2020


Another year comes to a close here in Thirdwiggville. A couple of little MOCs were completed in a year that was different. As a review, here is what I made this year. For 2020 I made the following: 2C Sports Car, 1E.R Track Car, John Deere 5115, LMP C Turbo, 8081 SRT Tremor, 8640 Update, and the Atmos Tractor.

Recapping last years goals I accomplished a good deal.

  • Another Unimog!!!! (Nope, but watch tomorrow)
  • Something PF (Nope)
  • An excavator (Nope)
  • A mini helicopter (completed)
  • An LMP car (completed, but not what I expected)
  • Thirdwigg Motors first EV! (Completed)
  • 7 completed builds (Completed)

This year was a little more prolific than last year, which saw more builds than 2018. Each of the builds were small or mid-sized, which is becoming my design language. Additionally, I am finding myself not making anything electrified. It has now been three years since I have made something powered. Finally, I am finding more of my builds are system based in that they allow lots of different additions and modifications of one main build. Tractors and Unimogs work well in this regard.

I loved the 2C Sports Car. It was stiff, functioned well, and met my aesthetic desires. More of these kind of “Thirdwigg Motors” cars will be coming. The Atmos tractor came together very quickly, and all the options I made for the front and rear kept my creativity going for much of the year. Frankly, it was like I made another four MOCs based on the time it took for all the trailers and implements. 8640 Update was a fun little quick build that turned out great and brought a smile to my face.

One final note, last year, I expressed concerns about LEGO buying Bricklink.com. So far no significant limitations have been implemented, which is great. I hope this continues in 2021.

For 2021, here are my goals.

  • A motorcycle
  • A sports sedan
  • Another midsized car (EV)
  • Something yellow
  • 7 completed builds

After 2020, it will be interesting to see what 2021 looks like, but I hope to continue some more fun builds. As always, watch The Queue to see what’s coming up. Happy Building!

Atmos Tractor


I guess I am on a little bit of a tractor kick lately.

Instructions may be found here.

Atmos Tractor

I had recently rebuilt my 9393 MOD, and as I took it apart, I wondered if I could make another tractor with the same implement attachments, improve the esthetics, and use different sized front and rear wheels. Then I thought maybe a pneumatic pump would be fun. My builds as of late have become much more dynamic, in that I like to be able to quickly change them or add a feature. Tractors work great for this, as adding a new trailer or implement can change the build dramatically. Additionally, I enjoy the challenge of making a system that supports lots of additions, while retaining the mechanics that my builds have always had.

Atmos Rear

The tractor came together very quickly for me. In 10 days I went from having a size draft of the tractor to a final MOC. I used the same driveline, albeit stretched, as the 9393 MOD so the mechanical parts were easy. Direct steering is used, and goes through a rear wheel drive system that connects to a two cylinder engine. A PTO is present at the rear of tractor, but not at the front. Adding a pneumatic pump required a stronger frame which was quickly modified, as well as a hose running to an attachment point at the rear.

The bodywork took the most time; about four days. I wanted to keep a simple hood, so I kept the design of 9393. I added some headlights to dress up the front, and the interior left some room for a steering wheel. Shaping the roof and the cabin was a little tricky due to all the half-stuff offsets of the front windshield. The fenders are simple, but match well. Just like that on day ten, the tractor was done. At the time of writing, the tractor can be built in orange, lime, white, and black.

Atmos with Mower

Part of what attracts me to building tractors is all the options one can present with a tractor: implements, trailers, plows, and on and on. The design of the tractor needed to support all of these possibilities. There is a hard point on the front, a hitch on the rear, and a three-point hitch on the rear.

Once these hard points were set, I began to spice it up. It’s no secret that set 8049 is one of my favorites, and since this tractor had a pneumatic pump, I thought a forestry trailer was needed. But then I wanted a snow plow, and a hooklift loader, and a dumper, and some farming equipment. So of course I built them all. You can find links to instructions for the tractor and most of the additions in my instructions tab.

Atmos Tractor with Trailers

The build was great little addition to my portfolio. The system supported a lot of different trailers and implements, some of which are still coming. The design language is consistent with my other builds, and the size is right in my sweet spot. I hope you enjoyed it too. Until the next build, happy building.

LEGO 8640 Update


In 1986, LEGO came out with one of my favorite little sets; set 8640. It is still one of my favorites, and instead of buying a 30ish year old set, I decided to update it.

You may found instructions here.

The build stared with a little variable pitch rotor design that I used previously in my executive helicopter, but since I was never really happy with this design, I kept it close on the shelf. After playing around with some panels, I found a shape that looked like the pontoons for the 8640 helicopter, and I was off.

Once the pontoons were set, the scale was clear, and I started placing some of the hard points for the mechanics. I wanted to have space for two technic figures, so the helicopter is a little wider than 8640, but otherwise the same size (length and height). The rotors and HOG crank are connected using a couple of bevel gears, and the swashplate is connected behind the two seats to a collective lever on the left of the helicopter. The swashplate moves up and down about one stud, which is enough.

Space for a pair of skis and poles

I tried to keep the design language close to 8640, so I kept the main white and yellow, with red and light blueish grey highlights. I wanted to have a cleaner mount for both the skis and poles for both Technic figures, but the solution I came up with works fine. The tail is a little different to match the studies build, and I added a horizontal stabilizer.

Everything worked well on this little helicopter, and I was pleased with how well it harkened back to 1986. I hope you enjoy.

8081 SRT Tremor


Lego set 8081 is one of my favorites. It’s a cute little set, that has some mechanical diffenciencies, so I have made a number of MODs of the set. Here’s another one.

The full gallery may be found here.

It’s becoming a bit of a bad habit for me to start a new project while I am currently building something else. While I was building the 8081 110, I founds myself making another draft of a little pickup. I moved pretty quickly on the 8081 110, but this project stalled. The chassis came together quickly. The live axle rear suspension is a simple design with five links to keep non-vertical movement at bay. The front is a simple independent wishbone design just like the original 8081. Finally, I placed a V-8 right over the front suspension, and geared it to the rear wheels. I used the new differential in the rear axle, which drives the V-8 a little faster than in my previous designs.

The sport pickup is a silly I idea that was all the rage in the United States in the late ’90s and early ’00s. Pickups like the SVT Lightning, the Ram STR-10, and my personal favorite the Dodge Dakota RT, were prevalent. This MOC slowed while I was trying to get the styling in the vein of these notable pickups. I liked what I designed for the front and rear bumper, and the rear bed was sufficient. But all the designs I came up with for the hood and the front grill looked dull and basic. Each of the above pickups had bold grills, and a hood line that communicated more power than anyone would need.

At some point, I realized I was not making any changes to the design, and I was running out of creativity. So it was time to be done.

While this is not my favorite MOD of 8081, it is another one to add to my long lists of MODs. The MOD worked well in that each of the simple features functioned without any problems. But I do feel like I did not do justice to 8081 with this MOD, nor did I represent any of those sport pickups well with this MOD. Maybe I’ll need to build a replacement soon….

Happy building.

LMP C Turbo


Every once and a while I participant in a Eurobricks Contest. This car was the entry into the TC18 Contest.

Full gallery may be found here.

01

The contest called for a small car using only two types of wheels, and not more than 15 studs wide. I like building small non-powered builds, so I decided to get to work. After working on a couple of drafts of car layouts, I decided on the LMP type C race car. It would be a little challenge, and allowed me to add some features that I wanted.

I new I would want an engine, steering, and removable bodywork panels just like a real LMP car. This morphed into a fully modular build. I started with the Monocoque which contains the steering, driver seat, roll structure, and rear engine and suspension mount.

08

Next I worked on the engine and rear axle. I used a mini V-8 design that is becoming common in LEGO designs, and made mine in such a way that it could be easily removed. The design incorporates an intake and turbo exhaust. The rear axle attached behind the engine. The entire assembly can be easily removed.

09

The bodywork took a little work, but only because I could not decide on the colors I wanted. Dark Azure was decided upon pretty quickly because it looked sharp, and had the small wheel panels. But the accent color was a little tricky. I liked yellow, white, black, but finally settled on lime. I hope you like the final look.

Everything worked well, and it looked the way I wanted it to. The result of the contest was about right in the middle on the 40ish contestants, so good, but not great.

I hope you enjoy the build. Happy building.

 

 

 

 

John Deere 5115


Sometimes you just do not want to shovel your own snow. Why not get a machine to do it for you?

The full gallery may be found on Flickr.com.

01

I have enjoyed building a number of tractors over the years, and I think it is mostly because I enjoy building all the implements. This little Deere is no exception. When I was making instructions for the Claas Atos, I found some inspiration from this picture. I wondered, “could I turn this into another tractor?” Yes, yes I could. So I was off on another mid-power tractor.

04

I decided on the John Deere 5115, which is a mid-power, open cab row tractor. I used the chassis of the Atos, so the tractor retained the drive, steering, front and rear PTO, and the front and rear three point hitch. I added a green fake engine, a new hood, and some new wheels and tires (Batmobile!). So it was a simple modification of a simple previous build.

I added a variable V-Plow on the front from M_Longer, and a simple spreader on the rear powered by the PTO.

The MOC worked just as well as the Atos, which it should. But the Deere looked a little better. The hood looked more complete, and the proportions looked a little better. Plus the color of the green and yellow always looks sharp.

Happy building.

1E.R Track Car


Thirdwigg Motors is not immune to the regulatory requirements of automotive manufacturing. As such, electrification has arrived!

Full gallery may be found on Flickr.com.

01

After the introduction of the 3T Sports Sedan and the 2C Sports Car, Thirdwigg Motors was ready to start exploring the electrification of vehicles. Since the previous vehicles all had internal combustion, in order to more into electrification, some testing was required. The car features a single electric motor just forward of the rear axle. Geared up 3:1, the motor provides sufficient acceleration and top speed.

10

Since this is track car suspension and bodywork are crucial for performance. The flat bottom of the car contributes to downforce, as does the rear wing and aerodynamic bodywork. The front and rear suspension is independent with torsen bars at each corner. There is very little wheel travel, appropriate for a track car. Steering is handed with the steering wheel, and the HOG just above the driver’s head.

The car was a good exercise to test a different drive mode in a LEGO car. Another electric car will soon be coming from Thirdwigg Motors, so this test vehicle was a good first step. The suspension was a little soft; it worked OK which was my experience with the Octan F1 as well. Frankly, the torsen system only works great for tanks in my experience, but maybe with a little work, it can have an application in future cars.

Until next time, happy building.

2C Sports Car


3T Sports Sedan was the inaugural car for startup Thirdwigg Motors, and the market requested another, smaller, sportier offering. The board of directors approved development of the 2C to fill this need.

Full gallery including instructions may be found here.

fullsizeoutput_193b

I wanted to keep the scale and keep many of the best parts of the 3T in this design but change the body style and add a couple of features. Very early I decided on a two door with a mid or rear engine. I wanted to get a better transmission, so with this, I set of to work. I scaled the car to the Porsche Cayman, and started fitting in parts. I used the same suspension from the 3T in both the front and rear, which constrained how the driveline would have to be routed.

fullsizeoutput_1945

It was at this point that the interior setup got a little complicated. When I started this car, the new Wave Selector was just release which optioned a lot of gearbox options. After seeing this great little transmission, I knew I had what I wanted: a four speed sequential transmission. After playing with some options, I place it in the middle of the car. I toyed with having the engine behind the rear axle, but settled on a mid placement. Nothing larger than a Flat 4 was ever considered. The four speed gearbox worked and a changeover axle ran to the front under the suspension where a simple rotation limiter was placed. The steering HOG and steering wheel had all of their mechanics in front of the transmission, so everything fit.

fullsizeoutput_1943

I had intentions of having a ratcheting gear selector to work with the slick sequential  transmission. But I was running out of space. The center of the car was taken up with the transmission, suspension at each end, and placing one in the rear did not give a way to connect to the transmission. So the only place left was under the front hood. There were a number of great change over options that work well. I tried each. Some fit, some worked great, but each had the same problem: there was not good way to seamlessly integrate the “button” into the bodywork. I had visions of pushing on a grill to actuate the mechanism, but the grill was not very big, and required even more space than I was already using. In the end I decided to scrap the idea of a changeover, and use a simple rotary selector. It is not fancy, but it works well, and keeps the bodywork clean.

fullsizeoutput_193c

Through out this process I was toying with ideas for the body work. Generally, I add parts as I like them, and when everything is placed, I rebuild the whole car with structures in place for all the final placements of critical internal and external parts. But this car had a large transmission in the middle which meant there was no frame running from the front to the rear. I added a structural frame under each door, and tried to build up the frame under the transmission as best as I could. It works, but there is still a little car flex under heavy center load.

First, the bodywork on this car works better for my eyes than the 3T, even though I tend to like sedans a little better. Second, the gearbox worked flawlessly. It was smooth, and even though I had the open the hood the change gears, the smoothness was worth it. Finally, the suspension worked great as it had proved itself in the 3T. It now adorns the desk at my work. Hopefully you enjoy it too.

Don’t worry, Thirdwigg Motors is already hard at work on the next car.

Happy Building.

2019


The final year of the decade closed here in thirdwiggville. As in years past, I am creating fewer MOCs than in years past, but with each completion, I am happy with the result. For 2019, I completed the following: Hunter Mk.III, John Deere 6130R, LEGO 42098 Car MOD, Iveco Skip Loader, Porsche 911 RS, and the 8081 110.

Again, I would have liked to complete a few more builds during a year, but I did increase from 2018, and small win.

Of the 2018 goals, here is what I accomplished:

  • A tractor (completed)
  • Car (Yep, two, and another tomorrow)
  • Skip loader truck (completed)
  • Something PF (Nope)
  • Another contest build (completed, Hunter MK. III)
  • An LMP car (Nope, but something is in the works)

I was very pleased with the Deere and the Skip Loader projects. Both were started in MID 2018, so it was nice to complete them. Both received lots of praise, which I was happy with.  I hope to create a couple more implements for the Deere before I take it apart. I was also great to do another 8081 MOD. Maybe more… Last year’s 3T Sports Sedans turned out a great, and Thirdwiggs Motors will be release another car tomorrow to flesh out the offerings a little more. Hopefully another MOC can be added in 2020.

For the third year in a row, I have completed only Bricklink.com order per month. My volume of parts is not expanding very quickly any longer, which is a great exercise in restraint. I only bought one set last year. I started using LEGO’s Pick-a-brick in 2018, and I am finding this more useful. Late in the year LEGO purchased Brinklink, and I am a little concerned about the changes that are coming. Bricklink.com has been one of the most significant websites to me, and I hope it will continue to be so.

For 2020 here are my goals:

  • Another Unimog!!!!
  • Something PF
  • An excavator
  • A mini helicopter
  • An LMP car
  • Thirdwigg Motors first EV!
  • 7 completed builds

My life is busy, so we will see how long I keep making MOCs. I am still motivated, and enjoy the builds. As always, check The Queue to see what’s coming. On to 2020, and another decade. Happy building.