MAN TGS Tipper Crane


I like to have a LEGO MOC on my desk at work. I find it to be a good conversation starter for visitors. It also gives my fidgety fingers something to do while I am on the phone. Plus it’s just cool. After I finally removed my 4×4 8081, I figured it would be time to add something new.

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MAN TGS

After a little research, I decided to make a MOC based on a MAN TGS tipper crane truck. I knew the MOC would not have any Power Functions, so I had the space to add a number of features. The truck would have 3 axles, a 4 function knuckleboom crane, three way tipper bed with drop sides, working outriggers, and of course working steering.

I started with the crane. It gave me a little trouble, but after trying countless linkages and connections, I came up with a simple design. I worked from the hook down to the truck. I started with the extending boom which was simply a 13L gear rack, and then added it to the main boom. I used a mini linear actuator (I love these) connecting to a simple linkage to the boom could rotate nearly 180 degrees. While the linkage could be a little more sturdy, it functions well and is controlled from a gear on the back of the crane. Finally, I mounted the second mini linear actuator directly on the turntable to lift the crane. This would be controlled with a gear on the back of the truck.

After the crane, I added the outriggers directly to the turntable. After toying with a lot of complex designs, I settled on something simple. Two 13L gear racks would move to out of the truck, and a pin with stop would be connected at the end and would move to stabilize the truck. I worked with the gearing for the stabilizers and the crane, and managed to get a working system. The center of the truck is pretty dense.

Next was the bed. I developed a simple linkage that would allow another mini linear actuator to tip the bed up. I connected the linkage so the bed could tip three ways. The whole system is three studs tall. At each corner of the bed, I added a simple connector so the bed could tip each way. The direction of tip could be adjusted based on which axles are removed. You can also remove a axle for each side, so contents could be dumped in three directions.

Finally, I worked on the body and the finishing of the truck. I think I got the look of the TGS pretty close, and added features like working doors, an exhaust pipe and an intake. Also, every Technic model in this scale needs to have blue seats, so I added them.

I wish the crane on the truck could support a little more, but other than that, I am pleased with the results. I really liked how the bed turned out. It’s simple and effective. And it all looks quite nice on my desk.

Until my next MOC (or MOD?), happy building.

Instructions can be purchased for $5 USD. Send and email to thirdwigg@gmail.com if you want a set.

The Sod Farm


During two summers when I was in college, I worked on a Sod Farm. It was, let’s say, a developmental experience. The days were hot, long, and often included nothing more than sitting on a tractor listening to the diesel drone as I would slowly mow the sod at 1.8 mph (2.9 kph).

While I would often  recite the dialogue of Sgt. Bilko in my head to pass the time, I did manage to develop a deep fascination for the machinery used. Two months ago, Eurobricks decided to hold a contest to create three Technic creations that would work together. After some thought about the rules, the parts I had, I thought I could create an entry, and offer something a little unique.

The full gallery may be found here, and instructions here.

The Sod Farm

The contest required three models that would work together in a particular setting. Each must have a part count that did not exceed 500 parts, and each had to be unique. While trailers were acceptable, I somehow felt offering an entry with a trailer did not allow for enough creativity. As my thoughts wondered on a bike ride, I decided I would create a small truck, a little forklift, and a sod harvester. My design would harken back to those days on the sod farm. Rather than the Freightliner Columbia and Piggyback Forklift we used, I designed a MAN TGS and a JCB 150T to have little more international flair, and frankly, to have a little more color. We used a Brouwer SH 1576 to harvest the sod, so I thought I should keep that machine.

The MAN TGS went through a number of revisions. Each was done to reach the part limit. The final MOC ended with a three function knuckleboom crane and a simple bed. In addition to the steering and the working doors, the crane is fully functional. The rotation is handled by a wheel on the right of the truck, and the main lift is handled by a wheel in the rear of the truck. The second stage lift and boom extension is handled by a small wheel at the top of the crane.

The JCB 150T was a simple and straightforward build. Recreating a MOC with a single arm lift created some additional challenges. A single mini linear actuator was used to lift the boom, and a worm gear system was used to adjust the tilt of the forks. The offset cabin caused some frustration, but I eventually figured it out.

Finally, the Brouwer SH 1576 was the purpose of this project. After a little research, I determined the scale of the project. I then started building. I usually add too many features to a MOC, and this harvester was no exception. The rear wheels spun a single differential, which ran straight to the front to power a two cylinder motor. Off the driveline was a PTO between the motor and the differential which would run the harvesting arm. The harvesting arm has a track system to drive the pieces of sod up to the back of the harvester to load the sod on the pallets. A simple cutting head was added to the front which had a cutter to cut the sod off the ground, and a timed cutter on the top to make sure each piece of sod was the correct size. After some work I added a simple steering system controlled by the smoke stack. Finally, I added a forklift system to hold and drop the pallets of sod off the back, and a small standing pad for the pallet worker.

This was the first LEGO contest I have entered since 1994. I hope you enjoy my entry. Thanks to Eurobricks.com for the contest. I appreciate your vote at eurobricks.com. In addition, instructions for the models can be found here.

For those counting (me), the number of parts needed for each MOC are: MAN TGS- 557, JCB 150T- 287 (inc 58 tracks), Brouwer 1576- 484 (inc 43 tracks)